Bisque Dolls - For more than 150 years, bisque dolls have been dressed in finery, sitting down to tea with their friends and loved ones. Now highly collectible, bisque dolls were originally purchased as toys some for as little as 10 cents. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

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Chatelaine's Antiques & Appraisals Magazine > Collectibles > Feature: Bisque Dolls: The Makers of Bisque Dolls



The Makers of Bisque Dolls

Value of Bisque Dolls

The Market for Collectible Bisque Dolls

Authenticity

Condition & Care of Dolls

See Doll Marker's Marks

Kewpie Dolls
 
BISQUE DOLLS: THE OLD TEATIME FAVORITE
 
 From childhood playthings to coveted collectibles


A Simon & Halbig doll

A Simon & Halbig doll.

For more than 150 years, bisque dolls have been dressed in finery, sitting down to tea with their friends and loved ones. Now highly collectible, bisque dolls were originally purchased as toys some for as little as 10 cents.

Often, children were only allowed to play with their bisque dolls for an hour or so on Sundays, or perhaps at Christmas with the gift of a new outfit.

THE MAKERS
The most popular of all antique dolls, bisque dolls originated in France circa 1840. Better known French companies include Jumeau, Steiner, and Bru. German companies such as Kammer & Reinhardt, Kestner, and Simon & Halbig began manufacturing bisque dolls around 1890. The American pottery maker Fulper made some bisque dolls, hiring college students to paint the faces.

Pretty Fulpers do exist, but generally they're not as valuable. Today the most widely collected dolls date from 1862 to 1920, the year when the most desirable dolls ended production. No one knows how many were made.


Character dolls like this sell for more than typical dolls.

"Character" dolls like this sell
for more than typical dolls.

Bisque is simply unglazed porcelain, thus lacking the shiny glaze of a china doll. Doll sizes range from 2 to 42 inches, with most in the 8 to 28-inch range. The faces of bisque dolls are handpainted (before firing), enhancing their individuality. Maker and rarity contribute to value. With certain dolls there are only four or five known. Most collectors develop a collecting pattern or category; one of every company, or all of one company, or only female dolls in fancy clothing.
 

 


Helen Paul - Doll Collection
Doll Collection
Buy This Art Print At AllPosters.com


Insider's Guide to German 'Dolly' Collecting: Girl Bisque Dolls: Buying, Selling & Collecting Tips
by Jan Foulke, Howard Foulke

Doll Costuming How to Costume French & German Bisque Dolls
by Mildred Seeley

Jumeau Dolls : Sticker Paper Dolls
by Brenda Sneathen Mattox

The Jumeau Doll
by Margaret Whitton

Simon & Halbig Dolls : The Artful Aspect
by Jan Foulke

Kestner, King of Dollmakers
by Jan Foulke, Howard Foulke

The Fulper Book
by John Hibel

Blue Book Dolls & Values, 15th Ed by Jan Foulke

Insider's Guide to Doll Buying & Selling : Antique to Modern, Insider's Guide
by Jan Foulke, Howard Foulke

The Handbook of Doll Repair and Restoration
by Marty Westfall

Care of Favorite Dolls: Antique Bisque Conservation
by Mary Caruso

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