Australian Customs: Importing Goods: Customs warning about weapons smuggling. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

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A Guide to Australian Customs: Importing Goods

 Customs warning about weapons smuggling

Customs has warned that those who attempt to circumvent Customs controls at international airports and mail centres and try to smuggle weapons and firearms equipment into Australia will be caught and will face heavy penalties.

Customs Regional Director WA Paul O'Connor said weaponry items are considered restricted imports under Customs regulations. "Restricted items can only be brought into the country if an application has been made prior to their importation. They are also subject to approval by the Minister for Justice and Customs," he said.

Mr O'Connor was commenting following four recent cases in Perth in which the courts had imposed fines on import offenders.

In the first case, heard in Perth Magistrates Court, a man received total fines and costs of $2,600 after admitting importing a prohibited import and making a false statement to Customs officers. The man, an Australian citizen, arrived at Perth Airport from Indonesia in September last year. During an examination of his and his brother's baggage, parts for soft air firearms were located. The court heard that the man told Customs he had broken down the firearms to avoid detection.

In a second case at Perth Magistrates Court, a man admitted importing a prohibited import and making a false statement and received total fines and costs of $2,300. Last November, Customs examined nine packages addressed to the man. The packages were found to contain 15 military style firearms magazines and assorted New Zealand Defence Force military goods including a helmet, a claymore mine test kit and a stock for a "Steyr" rifle.

At Perth Court of Petty Sessions, a man admitted importing a prohibited import and received a fine and costs of $1,600. The court heard that, while on holiday in the UK in August 2004, the man bought an air-rifle and a tin of .556 mm calibre air-rifle ammunition. He disassembled the air-rifle and placed it and the tin of ammunition into a parcel, along with some other items, and posted the package to his Australian address. The items were discovered when Customs officers examined the parcel.

In the fourth case, a firearms dealer was found guilty on five charges relating to importing a prohibited import, exporting a prohibited export and making false declarations. An application under S19B Crimes Act for the dealer to be discharged without conviction upon giving a $10,000 security and being of good behaviour for two years was granted. The dealer was ordered to pay $5,000 costs.

Visit the Australian Customs web site for more information.

 

 


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