The display of collectible paperweights is a highly varied and personal activity. There are numerous safe and creative ways to show off a collection, and although there is no "right" way to display paperweights, some techniques can make a collection look its best. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

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Chatelaine's Antiques & Appraisals MagazineCollectibles > Decorative Arts > Expert Tip: Preserving and Displaying Paperweights
 


Austrian Glass

Bohemian Glass

Cranberry Glass

French Art Glass

Georgian Drinking Glass

Understanding Glass and Glassmaking

Novelty Glass, friggers or Nailsea Glass

Orrefors Glass

Perfume & Perfume Bottles

Port Decanter

Pub Drink Dispenser

Pub Mirrors and Glass

Wine Decanter and Claret Jugs

Vaseline Glass

 
Preserving and Displaying Paperweights
 

 The display of collectible paperweights is a highly varied and personal activity. There are numerous safe and creative ways to show off a collection, and although there is no "right" way to display paperweights, some techniques can make a collection look its best.


The right light can make paperweights like this come alive

 Most serious collectors display their paperweights in a lighted and ventilated display case. In this scenario one has the most control of the presentation. Lights can be directed to show the stunning qualities of color and flaunt the intricacies of the workmanship.
  When lighted properly, paperweights can come alive. There are definite advantages of using display cases, especially if your collection is particularly valuable. The cases provide a crucial barrier between the collection and fingerprints or dust that can dull the clarity of the glass.


A display case is the best home
for this antique paperweight

 When using a display case, follow a few simple guidelines. If using a lighted display cabinet, it must be ventilated to regulate the heat generated by the lights
 Another common concern is that most display cases come equipped with shelves that are only ¼-inch thick. This may not be thick enough to support the weight of crystal paperweights. It's recommended that the glass be a minimum 3/8-inches-thick, and preferably 1/2-inch thick.

 However, not everyone has the space for a display cabinet, or a collection large enough to warrant the commitment. A space-saving option for the display of a smaller collection is a glass topped display table. In this set up, an external light source may be used to highlight the collection.

 Many paperweight enthusiasts opt to display their collections out in the open, on bookshelves, desktops, on bed stands, etc. This gives the flexibility to match individual paperweights with the décor of the room or with other collectibles.

 No matter which method of display one chooses there are a few steps that should be followed. There are two primary risks to paperweights. The first is to avoid direct sunlight. Extreme temperature changes can cause the glass the crack, and sunlight can be magnified through the glass, possibly causing fires or burns. Second, be wary of children who view these prized possessions as playthings.

 When placed in a safe location, paperweights can be enjoyed for a lifetime.


Images The Art of the Paperweight: Perthshire by Lawrence Selman

 


 

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