COLLECTING VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS: The invention of photography in the 1830s opened up new vistas, a new way of seeing that has forever changed the way we view the world. In fact, it's difficult for the modern mind to imagine the world before photography. Without photographic evidence, we're not as willing to grant the authenticity of an event, person or place. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

Click Here

Chatelaine's Antiques & Appraisals MagazineFine Art > Our Opinion: Collecting Vintage Photographs Series
 


Collecting Vintage Photographs Series

The Collectors Market

A Snapshot of Photography's Past

Where to start collecting photos

Appraising Vintage Photographs - Assessing the value of vintage photography

Care & Conservation of Old Photographs

Glossary of photography terms used by auction and collectibles people - with examples.

Collecting Antique Photographs

Civil War Photographs

Spanish-American War

Elton John's Photographic Collection

Caring for Your Family Treasures: Heritage Preservation
by Richard Long

 
COLLECTING VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 
 The invention of photography in the 1830s opened up new vistas, a new way of seeing that has forever changed the way we view the world. In fact, it's difficult for the modern mind to imagine the world before photography. Without photographic evidence, we're not as willing to grant the authenticity of an event, person or place.

 Together with the allied fields of film and video, photography has become the de facto record of our lives. The pervasiveness of photographic images is matched only by the universality of the act of photographing. Not everyone paints. Few of us have wielded a sculptor's hammer and chisel. But almost all of us have taken photographs. Hundreds, if not thousands of photographs.

 The egalitarian nature of photography helps explains its widespread appeal. As photographers, we can appreciate great photographs. In fact, many of the photographers we revere today were self-taught and did their best work as amateurs. Eugene Atget, for example, labored in obscurity for decades cataloguing his beloved Paris. His work went largely unnoticed at the time, but is now considered one of the milestones in the history of photography.

 But if you've ever become glassy eyed looking at someone else's travel snapshots, you already know that the mere act of taking a photograph doesn't qualify as art. What separates the amateur shutterbug from the artist is not technology-even the weekend hobbyist has access to much the same hardware as the pros-nor even strictly technique. It is an artistic vision that crafts images both before and after the shutter is opened.

 The challenge for the collector is to identify this artistic vision and separate the truly great (and therefore collectible) artists from the ordinary. Fortunately, the market has done some of the work for you. This article will introduce you to the fine art of photography and how to avoid some of the pitfalls of this fast growing field of collecting.

 


photos.com

Preserving Your Family Photographs:
How to Organize, Present, and Restore Your Precious Family Images

by Maureen Taylor

Jack Vettriano

Online Photograph Appraisal Request Form

Memory Gifts: Preserving Your Treasured Past in Special Ways
by Marie Browning

Making Scrapbooks: Complete Guide to Preserving Your Treasured Memories
by Vanessa-Ann

More Than Memories:
The Complete Guide for Preserving Your Family History

by Julie Stephani

Collector's Guide to Early Photographs
by O. Henry Mace

Conservation of Photographs (Kodak Publications, No F-40)
by George Eaton