To take the paint off without hurting the sculpture, we recommend that you take the dog to a conservator. Unfortunately, redware is a very porous material. That means unless it was highly glazed, traces of the paint will remain even after the dog is restored to its original condition. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

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Chatelaine's Antiques and Appraisals Magazine > Collectibles > Ceramics > Our Opinion: Restoring Ceramics
 


Ceramics Terminology

1950s Tableware
Art Deco Coffee Sets
Art Deco European Figurines
Wedgwood Black Basalte or Basalt
Biedermeier porcelain and ceramics
Victorian Breakfast China
Breakfast China
Repairing Broken China
Fixing Broken China
Chamber Pots
Character Jugs
Cheese Dishes
Identifying China
Chinese Porcelain
Cow Creamers
Cream Jugs
Wedgewood Cream Ware (creamware)
Danish China - Royal Copenhagen Factory
Danish Table China - Royal Copenhagen Factory
Derby Figures
Dinner Service
Doulton Figures
English Majolica ceramics
English porcelain and ceramics
Conta and Boehme Fairings
French Sevres Porcelain
French Porcelain
Goss Ware ceramics
Jugendstil Pottery
Mantelpiece Garnitures
Martin Brothers Pottery
Mason's Ironstone
Victorian Meat Plates
Mending Broken China
Noritake China
Oriental Porcelain
Wedgwood Pearlware
Pot Pourri vases and jars
Identifying Pottery
Pottery Marks
Collecting Salt and Pepper Shakers
Satsuma Pottery
Staffordshire Figures
Wade Whimsies
Collecting Wall Plates
Wedgewood Jasper Ware
West Country Art Pottery
Willow Pattern China
Worchester Porcelain

 

 
CAN THIS SCULPTURE BE CLEANED UP?

 
Dear Chatelaine's Antiques,

 Recently, I had some items appraised at a local charity fundraiser. I was told that this item might be by an artist named Samuel Bell, and that one just like it had recently sold for more than $200,000. The problem is that I have been unable to find any references to Samuel Bell or his artwork. It would seem that at some point the dog was painted, making it difficult to find out if he is signed.

 If you know anything about Samuel Bell, or his work, I would be grateful for the knowledge. I am also interested to know what I should do about the paint job. Is there some type of specialist I should contact to remove it?
E.J.

Dear E.J.,
 The reason you can't find any information about Samuel Bell may be that there's nothing to find. We couldn't find anything on him either. But get this, we found a Solomon Bell. He was a noted 19th-century sculptor of dogs!

 In 1995, a redware sculpture by Solomon Bell sold at Sotheby's New York for $13,000. Someone who thought they were making it "pretty" probably painted your dog.

 To take the paint off without hurting the sculpture, we recommend that you take the dog to a conservator. Unfortunately, redware is a very porous material. That means unless it was highly glazed, traces of the paint will remain even after the dog is restored to its original condition.

 



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