Tiffany lamps, with their shades made from lustrous pieces of glass set in bronze atop a bronze base, command a wide variety of prices. In 1998, for instance, a small desk lamp brought $1,610 at Sotheby's, while a "Pink Lotus" lamp in a 1997 Christie's sale fetched $2,807,500 still the highest price ever paid. Chatelaine's Antiques Collectibles Appraisals

 

Click Here

Chatelaine's Antiques and Appraisals Magazine > Decorative Arts > Feature: Tiffany Lamps: History and Value
 


Art Deco Sculptured Figures

Art Deco Figure Lamps

Sunflower Tiffany Lamp

 

Stiffel Tiffany Rose Table Lamp, 24.5"

 

 

 
Tiffany Lamps: History and Value

 Tiffany lamps, with their shades made from lustrous pieces of glass set in bronze atop a bronze base, command a wide variety of prices. In 1998, for instance, a small desk lamp brought $1,610 at Sotheby's, while a "Pink Lotus" lamp in a 1997 Christie's sale fetched $2,807,500 still the highest price ever paid.
 The lamps were first created in the late 1800s by Louis Comfort Tiffany. They were initially cherished for their bold colors, opalescent sheens, and naturalistic designs.

 But by the 1930s, as so often happens with any passing fashion, styles had changed. 


Tiffany Acorn Lamp

 Modern interiors were becoming less ornate. Tiffany's highly embellished lamps no longer fit in.

 For years afterwards Tiffany lamps languished in garage sales and flea markets. Then, in the late 1950s, interest in them was re-awakened by a museum exhibit of Tiffany's work. Connoisseurs took notice and the lamps have been sought after ever since.

 For collectors, especially novices, Tiffany lamps present an interesting problem. Unlike lots of other "object d'art" all Tiffany lamps are embossed on the inner rim of the shades and the underside of the base with "signatures," similar to embossed silver marks, naming L.C.T. or Tiffany Studios New York, among other labels, as the manufacturer. That should make authenticating them easy, right?

 Unfortunately, no, since competitors from almost the very beginning slapped Tiffany labels on their own products.
Collectors instead should look for the high-quality, beautifully colored and textured glass Tiffany called "Favrile," or handmade, and not place too much emphasis on the Tiffany label.

Keep a look out for the rare, blue daffodil-patterned Tiffany lamp with a pineapple motif on the base. One day you could have socks hanging on it, the next it could fetch $20,000 in the salesroom.

 



Tiffany Butterfly Lamp
from Marshall Field's

Tiffany, a Quest for Beauty
by Jacob Baal-Teshuva

Stained Glass: A Guide to Today's Tiffany Copper Foil Technique
by Kay Bain Weiner

Tiffany Stained Glass Giftwrap Paper 
 Four Different Designs on Four 18x24 Sheets With Four Matching Gift Cards

by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Tiffany Stained Glass Windows 16 Art
by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Six Tiffany Stained Glass Windows Cards with Cards
by Louis Comfort Tiffany

Tiffany Glass (Centuries of Style)
by Clare Haworth-Maden

Tiffany Stained Glass Windows
by Alastair Duncan

Tiffany-Style Stained Glass Lampshades
by Connie Clough Eaton

Tiffany Windows: Stained Glass Pattern Book
by Connie Clough Eaton

Louis Comfort Tiffany (Essentials)
by William Warmus

Behind the Scenes of Tiffany Glassmaking
by Martin Eidelberg